Thursday

Talking to your children about Bullying using Netflix #StreamTeam

One of the most common questions that I receive from parents is "how do I help my child deal with a bully"?

It can be tough to know how to talk to our children about the topic. We don't want to scare them, but at the same time we need to educate and empower them.

Don't know how to start the conversation? Let Netflix help. You might not think of Netflix as a resource when talking to your children about this tough topic. But in honor of National Bullying Prevention Month they have put together an amazing list of movies to help you start the bullying discussion with your children, regardless of their age.

Remember, kids learn in different ways, and in this new age, technology can be a powerful way to get the conversation started. Your children will be able to relate to the movies and it will give you a great foundation for starting difficult but important conversations.

For smaller children...show them that there is a hero in all of us.


Little Kids
1. Hercules
2.Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius
3.Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes
4.Spy Kids: All the Time in the World
5.Justice League Unlimited
6.Ben 10: Alien Force


If you have older children...show them real and relevant stories about kids who fight back.

Big Kids
1. Bully
2.The War
3.Billy Elliott
4.The Fat Boy Chronicles
5.Cyber Bully

Watch the movies together and start asking questions. Here are a few that can be applied to all the movies

How do you think he felt when that happened?
What would you do if you were in the same situation?
How could you have helped her?
Do any of those things ever happen to you at school?
Do you know what it means to be bullied?
Do you know what to do if you are ever bullied?

Choose movies and ask questions appropriate to your child's age and understanding.

It is also important that as parents we know the warning signs of bullying. As well as what we can do  to help our children.

Warning Signs of Bullying


  • Unexplained Injuries
  • Lost or destroyed clothing, book, electronics, etc.
  • Frequent headaches and/or stomach aches, faking illness and feeling sick
  • Changes in eating habits, like skipping meals or eating a lot. (Kids coming home from school hungry might mean they didn't eat lunch)
  • Trouble Sleeping
  • Bad Dreams
  • Poor grades
  • Not wanting to go to school
  • Loss of friends
  • Disinterested in social situations
  • Decreased self esteem
  • Running away from home
  • Harming themselves
  • Talking about harming themselves
 Read this past FamilyVolley post for more tips on what can be done to help our children. 

Have your children ever been bullied?
What do you, or have you told your child about bullying? 


I am a member of the Netflix Stream Team. All thoughts and opinions are my own. 

1 comment:

  1. Are you interested in helping others? Can you handle and care for people who learn differently and have other behavioral problems? Do you want to make a difference in a young child's life? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, then you might consider a career in special education. Below is a breakdown of the short and long-term responsibilities of a special education teacher.http://www.writingdesk.pw/

    ReplyDelete

Hi Hi! It always makes my day to hear what you have to say. Let's keep this conversation going. Thank you for your comments. Don't want to leave a comment here, email me at blog.familyvolley@gmail.com.

 
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